“Final Fantasy VII”: Wutai (Takkoku no Iwaya Bishamondo Temple in Hiraizumi, Japan) and Earth’s Wutai Mountain

Long name, right? Before I go into Wutai and the temple, I just want to note that Hiraizumi is known for its historical sites, so it would be so interesting to visit one day! Hopefully, I will be in Japan next year as planned…*crosses fingers*)

Ironically, I thought the real Wutai Mountain had less resemblance because it’s been so modernized in some parts. Well, I’ll put both places and you can be the judge.

First, Wutai in all it’s 1997 glory:

2584058-2326567539-FFVII

Wutai

 

 

Now for the temple:

in%20hiraizumi%20japan

58304879

 

 

(jp.worldmapz.com)

image

 

(atlasobscura.com)

 

And now for the real life Wutai Mountain:

wutai_mountain_sacred_place

 

wutai_mountain_shanxi

 

(both from chinatourguide.com)

To be honest, it was a bit hard to find big pictures, so hopefully the resolution turns out well…

 

Two posts back to back…I usually don’t find resemblances so close to each other!

Well, until next time~~ mata postsuru hi made…..

 

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. wutaishan
    Dec 30, 2015 @ 12:50:24

    With its five flatt peaks, Mount Wutai is a sacred Buddhist mountain. The cultural landscape iis home to
    forty-one monasteries and includes the East Main Hall of Foguang Temple, the highest surviving timber building oof tthe
    Tang dynasty, with life-size clay sculptures. It also features the Ming dynasty Shuxiang Temple with
    a huge complex of 500 statues representing Buddhist storiees woven intfo three-dimensional picfures of mountains and water.
    Overall, the buildings on the site catalogue the wway in which Buddhist architecture developed and influenced palace building in China for
    over a millennium. Mount Wutai, literally, ‘the five terrace
    mountain’, is the highest in Northern China and is remarkable foor its morphology of
    precipitous slopes with five open treeless peaks. Temples havge been built on this site from the 1st
    century AD to the early 20th century.

    Like

    Reply

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